New corridor tool: Makurhini

Makurhini (Connect in Purépecha language) is an R package for calculating fragmentation and landscape connectivity indices used in conservation planning. Makurhini provides a set of functions to identify connectivity of protected areas networks and the importance of landscape elements for maintaining connectivity. This package allows the evaluation of scenarios under landscape connectivity changes and presents an additional improvement, the inclusion of landscape heterogeneity as a constraining factor for connectivity.

The network connectivity indices calculated in Makurhini package have been previously published (see Resources below), and it allows the integration of efficient and useful workflow for landscape management and monitoring of global conservation targets.

For questions or comments about Makurhini please contact the developers:

Oscar Godinez: Researcher of Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad (Conabio). México. e-mail: oscjaguar@gmail.com

Camilo A. Correa-Ayram: Researcher of Instituto de Investigación de Recursos Biológicos Alexander von Humboldt. Colombia. e-mail: ccorrea@humboldt.org.co

Resources

Makurhini at GitHub

Saura, S., Bertzky, B., Bastin, L., Battistella, L., Mandrici, A. and Dubois, G. 2018. Protected area connectivity: Shortfalls in global targets and country-level priorities. Biological Conservation 219: 53-67.

Saura, S., Bastin, L., Battistella, L., Mandrici, A. and Dubois, G. 2017. Protected areas in the world’s ecoregions: How well connected are they?. Ecological Indicators 76: 144-158.

Saura, S., Estreguil, C., Mouton, C. and Rodríguez-Freire, M. 2011. Network analysis to assess landscape connectivity trends: application to European forests (1990–2000). Ecological Indicators 11(2): 407-416.

2020-05-04T12:51:12-04:00 April 16th, 2020|

About the Author:

Heather Cayton
Heather Cayton is the Managing Director of ConservationCorridor.org and a Research Assistant at Michigan State University. She received her B.S. from the University of Virginia and her M.S. from Virginia Tech, and has spent over 10 years studying corridors and rare butterflies in North Carolina.